About your Search

20121108
20121116
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
everyone is talking about this week, david petraeus. we are glad you have joined us. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: tomorrow night on this program, we'll bring you our conversation with frank rich. he takes a critical look of what went wrong for the gop and the prospects of moving forward. that should be a good conversation tomorrow night. tonight, we wanted to start this week with the story that is shaking up washington. the sudden resignation of cia director david petraeus. thomas ricks is a pulitzer prize-winning journalist and a best-selling author. he is a fellow at the center for a new american security. good to have you back on this program. let's get the petraeus stuff at of th
at of the way first. i want to go straight to your blog. the sudden departure of general david petraeus from the cia tells us more about the state of our nation than a dozen petraeus. president barack obama should not have accepted his resignation. we seem to care more about the sex lives of our leaders down their real lives of our soldiers. i want to pick that apart one piece at a time. he suggests that his resignation says more about the nation about him? what do you mean? >> it worries me that we can throw away the leaders so casually. general petraeus is one of the more prominent generals of our time. the only general the american public has really been known since world war ii. a lot of generals tried and failed in iraq. petraeus succeeded. here we have a leader who has done well. something happened between him and another person, a private consenting adults, nothing illegal, and we throw him out. i do not think we can afford to do that. we did not use to do that. dwight eisenhower carried on with his chauffeur, a very good- looking red-haired british woman. he was not fired. ike, you g
of what they were looking at. and in a sense, david petraeus became free of that pressure and that compulsion in the moment that that was revealed. and so i think people have raised a question once that was done if he's not now in the military and there's not a uniform code of military justice issue, was it necessary for him to resign as cia director. jim clacker the director of national intelligence thought the answer was yes and i think that was for two reasons. first younger people at the cia are told if you get involved in anything compromising, if you have an affair have you to disclose and he and i didn't and with this event double standard. and the second argument was you may not be a gentleman now but you used to be but you ought to live by the rules general officers live by. if you look at it through that optic. when the fbi sends this to the director of national intelligence, general clacker who i used to work for, they don't know what he's going to do with it and they take no position on it. they wonder is he going to put it in a drawer and say in a couple weeks
including the political implications of the david petraeus story and what a second of, term might look like. we're glad you've joined us. a conversation with frank rich coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and tavis: a quick look at what is coming up on this program. actress keira knightley is on. and her film "anna karenina" based on the tolstoy classic. thursday and friday night, a two-part conversation. you do not want to miss this, sally field portrays mary todd lincoln in the new steven spielberg film. we continue our look at the fallout from this year's presidential election with frank rich, the former ku near times writer. his piece in the magazine this week is called "fig
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)